#ActuallyAutistic

When you encounter another person and you sense a difference, how do you respond? I hope the following poem gives you a moment of pause. (I hope it helps me to be more sensitive to others, also.)

Anonymously Autistic

A poem inspired by the #ActuallyAutistic and #SheCantBeAutistic hashtags that I keep seeing all over the place this week.

#ActuallyAutistic

You are a bit awkward aren’t you?

Actually, I am Autistic.

Autistic? You seem normal to me.

You can’t see Autism.

But you seem so intelligent.

Lots of Autistic people are smart.

You just need to practice socializing more.

I am already doing my best.

Autistic people can’t sit still.

We can, but it is hard and takes more concentration.

You must be high functioning.

Today I am, but sometimes I’m not.

Are you just looking for attention?

No, actually I prefer to be left alone.

You don’t look Autistic.

Actually I’m Autistic.

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Published by

Rose Wolfe (Living Free with disAbilities)

Let's get to the elephant first: I have myotonic dystrophy which defines my physical limitations, but it does not define me. Without the distraction of physical activities, I have found my passions: (1) Encouraging others to live more fully with fun, faith, and hope; (2) finding freedom in oil painting; (3) writing about my experiences; and (4) encouraging others to live more passionately. It is my belief that every person lives with at least one disability - for impairments are not limited to those with chronic illnesses. Many neurotypical people are psychological architects who have constructed enclosures in which they trap themselves. Mindsets, attitudes, and perceptions are fluid realities. Many of us have forgotten that it is possible how to live beyond our disabilities. Life may have challenges but faith and hope are within reach. I have made my choice: I am LivingFreeWithdisAbilities.

4 thoughts on “#ActuallyAutistic”

  1. Even though I am experiencing the flip side of the neuro-typical coin, this poem is still a timely reminder of the importance of accepting people for who they are. Without thinking I find myself defaulting to the neuro-typical bias. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

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