What’s Wrong with Ordinary?

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Recently, I was forced into the noisy and congested world typical of American life.  Yep.  I had to go shopping.

It all started the moment I tried to squirt a little bit more of the most basic of all oil paints, Titanium White, onto my palette.  With a PFFTHHPPPPP the remaining paint plopped out.  Reaching for my backup tube, I found. . . nothing.  Yep.  That tube of Titanium White stuck in the back of the rack?  It wasn’t white.  It was Ultramarine Blue.

What?  Impossible!  Agghh!  Okay, don’t panic.  Just get some delivered.

Normally I can accomplish this task with a few clicks and, violá, the deed is done.  Not this time.

Having pulled out my handy, lightweight laptop computer, I searched for a site that would deliver some paint within a few days.  (Another experience of the typical American life.)  However, with a click-click here and a click-click there, I discovered that it would take, drum roll – please, two weeks for the paint to arrive.

Oh, phooey, ptooey.  I have to go to the store.

So, off I went to one of those big box stores that sell home goods, craft items, and art supplies.  I live at least an hour away from any major city.  Yet, I only had to travel 15 miles to buy my oil paint.  (Another one of those pretty awesome miracles of the ordinary American life.)

As I rolled into the store, my eye noticed a sign for sale, “Be Original, Not Ordinary.”  Huh?  What’s wrong with ordinary?

Published by

Rose Wolfe (Living Free with disAbilities)

Let's get to the elephant first: I have myotonic dystrophy which defines my physical limitations, but it does not define me. Without the distraction of physical activities, I have found my passions: (1) Encouraging others to live more fully with fun, faith, and hope; (2) finding freedom in oil painting; (3) writing about my experiences; and (4) encouraging others to live more passionately. It is my belief that every person lives with at least one disability - for impairments are not limited to those with chronic illnesses. Many neurotypical people are psychological architects who have constructed enclosures in which they trap themselves. Mindsets, attitudes, and perceptions are fluid realities. Many of us have forgotten that it is possible how to live beyond our disabilities. Life may have challenges but faith and hope are within reach. I have made my choice: I am LivingFreeWithdisAbilities.

8 thoughts on “What’s Wrong with Ordinary?”

  1. There’s a difference between “be original” when you choose to. “Being ordinary” means the world is designed for your needs and so meeting your own needs takes minimal effort. If only “being ordinary” was a choice one could act on.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Well stated. I saw the two sides of the coin: (1) “Developed countries” have many “ordinary” conveniences that are truly extraordinary, and (2) as someone who is no longer a full participant in the “ordinary” life of the neurotypical world, I can appreciate how wonderful the ordinary can be. I guess I would like to see a sign that said, “Want to be original? Be grateful you’re ordinary.”

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My parents in trying to downplay any over the top behaviour we might engage in as kids would say, “Doe maar gewoon, dan ben je gek genoeg.” Translated roughly means “Act normal, then your are being crazy enough.”

        Liked by 1 person

  2. “Creativity is more than just being different. Anybody can plan weird; that’s easy. What’s hard is to be as simple as Bach. Making the simple, awesomely simple, that’s creativity” – Charles Mingus

    Like

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