C. S. Lewis — English Lit Geek

“What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing. It also depends on what sort of person you are.” ~ C.S. Lewis (1898-1963)

via C. S. Lewis — English Lit Geek

Found this quote on The English Lit Geek blog site.  C.S. Lewis’ words ring true today.  What do you see and hear?

Published by

Rose Wolfe (Living Free with disAbilities)

Let's get to the elephant first: I have myotonic dystrophy which defines my physical limitations, but it does not define me. Without the distraction of physical activities, I have found my passions: (1) Encouraging others to live more fully with fun, faith, and hope; (2) finding freedom in oil painting; (3) writing about my experiences; and (4) encouraging others to live more passionately. It is my belief that every person lives with at least one disability - for impairments are not limited to those with chronic illnesses. Many neurotypical people are psychological architects who have constructed enclosures in which they trap themselves. Mindsets, attitudes, and perceptions are fluid realities. Many of us have forgotten that it is possible how to live beyond our disabilities. Life may have challenges but faith and hope are within reach. I have made my choice: I am LivingFreeWithdisAbilities.

15 thoughts on “C. S. Lewis — English Lit Geek”

  1. This from a friend of mine Peter, who owned an apple orchard.

    Visitor: Wow. Got to get a picture of those trees. It’s so beautiful seeing the contrast of red apples and green leaves.

    Peter: What looks beautiful to me is seeing the trees in a few weeks when I can only see green leaves.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. First of all, C. S. Lewis was a brilliant man, so it ‘might’ be worth listening to his words! 😉

    When my cherished dog, Sugar, passed on, an acquaintance remarked: Yeah, but it’s nice to get a new one!
    I was shocked by her insensitive words. Three years on, I still miss the company of my best friend. We’d been together through so much hardship.

    Love + hugs Rose 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Rose, I once had a tiny Yorkie like your Honey. I was 19 and in a relationship but didn’t feel old enough to have a human baby – though I wanted one! So, I got my little Christopher Columbus (named after the film that year). He was a perfect little dog, loved his ball playing, could outwalk my then boyfriend’s German shepherd!
        I hope you have some photos of your Honey 🙂
        I believe that those people who don’t see the intelligence/sensitivity/wisdom of dogs, horses, cats etc are people who are very much out of touch with themselves and the rest of the connecting world.
        xo

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Columbus weighed about 3 pounds. Your Honey was incredibly small!
        Sugar, Chihuahua, weighed a little less than Columbus, she was the runt of the litter – like a long thin sausage with barely any hair, so small, black and white, patterned like a cow! I got her in the spring, come autumn she still hadn’t grown much hair, despite her being a long-hair, so I made her a coat from a sock! Cut out holes for her legs. It worked well. I used to carry Sugar inside my leather jacket, on the tram, in the malls, in the restaurants (some German restaurants didn’t mind her) and in a little family owned cinema. Yes, my best friend. So precious, aren’t they? And, it isn’t about sentimentality, it goes deeper than that.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I was reprimanded once for having Sugar inside a supermarket although she was in my jacket. The Germans are even more dog friendly than us Brits. But, we do welcome them in our pubs, even where food is served.
        When I made the sock coat (1998), I was thinking what a shame it was that there aren’t any dog clothes in Germany – there were in the UK – and how Americans must have a great selection of dog wear and everything possible for dogs! That winter my parents sent Sugar a padded green coat with a fluff lined hood 😀

        Liked by 1 person

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