View From My Wheelchair: Who Is That? Do I Look Sick?

Rose Wolfe eyes

Has it ever happened to you?  You are washing your hands and, without thinking, you look up and see some stranger in the mirror looking back at you?  In that split second, you are shocked.  “Who is that person,” you wonder?

I mean, I know it’s me.  Yet, it’s not Me. It’s not the Me I was. It’s not the Me I thought I would be. It’s not even the Me I think I am.

So, who is that person looking back at me?  What do people see when they look at her?  Who do they think she is?

Just the other week, someone said to me, “You know, you don’t look sick.”   Do they mean I don’t look like someone who needs a wheelchair and is, therefore, faking it somehow?  Or, do they mean I look better than someone should look when they are mobility challenged?  What does sick look like?

Does it even matter?

This is a strange concept to me.  I don’t look sick.  Hmmm.  Does that mean that I need to wear sweat clothes and gym shoes?  Does it mean I should not wear makeup?  If you saw someone wearing sweat clothes, would you say, “Oh, look, that person is sick.”?  How about if you saw someone without makeup on?  What conclusions would you draw?

And, if I were to dress in a different way, what would I be saying about myself?  What would I be saying to you?  Some people have no choice.  They have been burdened with a stroke or paralysis.  This does not mean they are sick.  They are disAbled, mobility challenged, and dependent on a caretaker.

My reflection has changed.  My disease is changing my face.  And, I don’t always immediately recognize that woman in the mirror.  Still, she doesn’t look sick.

I keep coming back to the same question: What does it mean to look sick?  I don’t have an answer.

What I do know is that I don’t look sick because I’m not – sick.

Published by

Rose Wolfe (Living Free with disAbilities)

Let's get to the elephant first: I have myotonic dystrophy which defines my physical limitations, but it does not define me. Without the distraction of physical activities, I have found my passions: (1) Encouraging others to live more fully with fun, faith, and hope; (2) finding freedom in oil painting; (3) writing about my experiences; and (4) encouraging others to live more passionately. It is my belief that every person lives with at least one disability - for impairments are not limited to those with chronic illnesses. Many neurotypical people are psychological architects who have constructed enclosures in which they trap themselves. Mindsets, attitudes, and perceptions are fluid realities. Many of us have forgotten that it is possible how to live beyond our disabilities. Life may have challenges but faith and hope are within reach. I have made my choice: I am LivingFreeWithdisAbilities.

3 thoughts on “View From My Wheelchair: Who Is That? Do I Look Sick?”

  1. I don’t think I show the pain much in my face. But then it’s hard to self evaluate, isn’t it. I know I’m fed up with it – and the resulting limitations – and I don’t want to always pay attention to it. It’s taken (stolen) too much already. It’s a crazy way to live and despite our best interactions, it puts up barriers between us and our loved ones. I think it’s nice that you take effort with your appearance, to please yourself – I do, too. We are not gone from this world yet! 🙂

    Hugs my friend
    🐻 💜 💄 👗 👒

    Liked by 1 person

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