Disabled? Now What?

 

 

 

Eggplant-WEB
Farmer’s Market by Rose Wolfe

 

Every experience, skill, or career has foundational basics.  When you were in school, before you could solve an algebraic formula you needed to learn basic math skills.  Foundational skills, truths, or assumptions have an impact on everything we do.  We live out our lives using these elements as the groundwork without giving them much thought.

For example, imagine you just walked in the door of your home, and it is time to make dinner.  You don’t know exactly what you will be serving, but you toss some onions and vegetables into a pan and let them work their magic.  These basic ingredients for a savory meal can morph any ingredients you choose.  As the onion and peppers release their delicious aroma into the air; everyone who catches a whiff is enticed with the promise.  Sometimes, the ingredients are determined by what is available in the pantry.  If you are an experienced cook, then as long as you have some foundational elements, you will cook with confidence.  You have faith in your basic ingredients and in your skills developed through experience.

Living with a chronic disease is similar to being a cook with a limited pantry.  What we do each day is determined by what energy or help is available to us.  Yesterday has no bearing on today.  We do not know what we will have at the end of each day.  We create our experience as we go along.  Nevertheless, we always start with the basics of our beliefs based on our experiences.

So, what do we believe, and what interpretation do we make based on our experiences?  It seems that it would be to our benefit if we could find a way to articulate our basic beliefs about what we need, want, and expect.  I know that it would help me.  For example, last night just as I was going to sleep, I mentioned to my husband that I wanted to take a shower before heading off to church in the morning.  I had already mentioned it to him the day before, but I wanted to remind him so that he would set the alarm clock to allow us enough time.  Because I need his help to get showered, dressed, and hair dried, the time required is significantly different then days when I skip the shower before church.  He responded with a less than enthusiastic reply.  At the time, I let it go.  Now, hours later, I am playing the events over in my head.

This is the moment where I begin to cook my experience.  What are my basics, my onion and peppers?  What do I believe, and what interpretation do I stir into the mix?  Do I tell myself that my husband is unhappy or frustrated or some other emotion?  How do I respond to my belief?  What type of meal am I making?  Will it be savory or bitter?  Now is the moment of decision.  All realities are available.  All avenues of emotions are ready to react.

By conscious decision, I need to reign in and take a survey of what ingredients will I be using from the pantry of my experiences.  Why would I choose an interpretation that is less than favorable about a man who thinks about my comfort and needs all the time?  Just maybe I heard something that wasn’t there.  What I expected and wanted was an acknowledgment of a previously agreed to activity.  What I need is more tenuous.  This is the thin, tender layer that covers my heart.  I need to feel as if I am not a burden.  So, any little imagined or real indication that I might, just might, be a bother puts me on edge.  Nevertheless, I need to respond and not react.  I don’t even know if I am correct.  Even more important, even if I am correct and he was less than enthusiast about helping me shower in the morning, so what?

There are times when I am unable to think rationally and clearly.  This is not one of those times.  The more that I practice asking myself the critical questions (What are my basic beliefs?  What do I need, want, and expect?  What is my interpretation?), the better I will get at responding and not reacting.

Our lives are complicated and arduous.  We face demanding situations every day.  Let us choose to add love, hope, and peace to the mix.  Onions might be a basic to making a savory meal, but love is a basic ingredient to living a life that has a pleasing aroma; everyone who catches a whiff knows that a promise is being made.

What about you?  What are your basics?

Published by

Rose Wolfe (Living Free with disAbilities)

Let's get to the elephant first: I have myotonic dystrophy which defines my physical limitations, but it does not define me. Without the distraction of physical activities, I have found my passions: (1) Encouraging others to live more fully with fun, faith, and hope; (2) finding freedom in oil painting; (3) writing about my experiences; and (4) encouraging others to live more passionately. It is my belief that every person lives with at least one disability - for impairments are not limited to those with chronic illnesses. Many neurotypical people are psychological architects who have constructed enclosures in which they trap themselves. Mindsets, attitudes, and perceptions are fluid realities. Many of us have forgotten that it is possible how to live beyond our disabilities. Life may have challenges but faith and hope are within reach. I have made my choice: I am LivingFreeWithdisAbilities.

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