View From a Wheelchair: The Perfect Life

As I look up, I can’t fail but to notice my wheelchair. Tucked into a corner, still it sits predominantly in the room. This is my reality. I do not deserve more – nor do I deserve less.

Over the years, friends have  told me how unfair it seems to them that I have myotonic dystrophy. These kind words reveal at least two things about them: (1) they are sorry that I have to contend with a debilitating disease, and (2) because I had already had some tough times, I should not have to experience more troubles. I am grateful for their love. Still, it made me wonder. What does anyone deserve?

It has become increasingly difficult not to consider the big picture. Our Western minds are geared to be positive and assumptive. History has been charitable to us. We have won wars, ruled over others as if we were benevolent dictators, and enjoyed a lifestyle unequaled in many parts of the world. Even our poor are not poor when compared to third-world countries. Not until 9/11 did we stop to think that maybe other countries could hate us.

Our self-assuredness and entitlement run deep in our souls. We tell ourselves that we are God’s elect. When troubles and suffering are experienced, some believe that we are being punished by God. Karma is at play. There are underlying assumptions here: good things happen to good people; bad things happen to bad people. We want justice. We want ours!

This concept of the perfect life can leave us feeling unfulfilled. We compare to our demise.  Our definition of what constitutes the good life can cause us to feel cheated. Do you think that if you work hard, are kind, and follow the rules, then you are guaranteed a wonderful life?

Why should we expect a certain outcome? Do we deserve anything? There are no guarantees. Nothing is fair. Nothing is perfect. There is no perfect spouse, child, job, home, country, or life.

You don’t need a perfect life to be happy.

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NUTTY GRANOLA RECIPE

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SIGGI’S YOGURT TOPPED WITH NUTTY GRANOLA

 

Time for a little diversion. We need to feed our bodies as well as our minds and souls. So, I am sharing my favorite homemade granola. It is good in a bowl with some almond milk, as a topping on yogurt, or just for snacking.

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup organic, rolled oats (certified gluten-free)
1/4 cup sliced, raw almonds
1/3 cup coconut sugar
1/4 tsp Himalayan salt
1/4 tsp. Ceylon (or Mexican) cinnamon
1 egg white
3 Tbsp. water
3 Tbsp. raw, organic honey
1 tsp. grapeseed oil
2 cups raw walnuts
1 cup raw pecans
1-2 handfuls of raisins

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.
  2. In a food processor, combine the oats, almonds, coconut sugar, salt, and cinnamon. Pulse until you have a rough chop. Do not pulse until you get a flour. Pour into an additional bowl and set aside.
  3. In the empty food processor, add the walnuts and pecans. Pulse to break nuts into pieces.
  4. In a large mixing bowl, beat the egg white until foamy (but not stiff). Add the waterhoney, and oil; whisk to combine.
  5. Add the walnuts and pecans pieces to the bowl of liquid and completely cover the nuts. Use your hands.
  6. Add the oat mixture to the bowl with the nuts. Using your hands, cover the nuts with the oat mixture. You will have more mixture than nuts.
  7. Spread the mixture onto a parchment-lined baking sheet.
  8. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Watch carefully to prevent burning. After 7 minutes, gently stir the mixture.
  9. After removing from oven, add the raisins.

 

View From a Wheelchair: Caretaker Burnout

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She stood there glaring me and then burst into tears. Sobbing, she said, “I just can’t take it anymore! I feel guilty and angry all the time. I don’t know what to do.”

Caretakers. How often do we fail to recognize the demands on their time and energy? Whether they are family members or professionals, the stressors they face are so constant that caregivers are in danger of “burn out.” First, they start feeling irritated, then frustrated, which leads to anger. Eventually, they are depressed. Sadly, they might not know what has happened to them. How can we help?

Standing in the gap, the caregiver has two roles: they assist with activities of daily living, and they are ambassadors for the disabled. Without any prompting on their part, the world will automatically engage with them in our stead. For example, yesterday, I went to Target with my caretaker. As I rolled up to the counter, I looked straight at the cashier. Ignoring me, she addressed my caretaker. I did not exist to her. My caretaker’s presence is acknowledged, and, often, I am not. This reaction from the public not only puts the disabled person in an awkward position, but it also can be disquieting for the caretaker.  How should they respond when their companion is ignored? Should they respond? Is it their role to respond?

The role of the caretaker can be confusing. One minute they are functioning as the helper, the next minute they are functioning as themselves. Imagine the stress involved in having to live two lives at once. Their time is not their own. (If you are a parent, I am sure you can relate to the fatigue, frustration, depression, or anger that can set in as a result of the stress.) Burnout is a constant peril for the caregiver.

Recently, I posted a blog about the attributes of a good caretaker (The Essential Attitudes of a Caretaker). Now, I would like to examine what healthy attitudes we, the disabled, should have about our caretakers. How can we help them?

Below is a list of the stressors that are part of the daily life of a caregiver:

  • Tasking Expectations: Often, establishing appropriate expectations for what can, should, or needs to be accomplished is overlooked or ignored.
    • One way we can help is by asking ourselves if our behavior is reasonable or if our requests are suitable. For example, recently, I ran out of homemade granola and homemade spiced nuts at the same time. Because we did not have enough ingredients to make both recipes, we went grocery shopping.  By the time we returned to the house, it was mid-afternoon. Even though I wanted to have my homemade granola for breakfast the next morning, I put aside my desire and asked myself if I were making a reasonable request. Immediately, I knew I was not.  There were other tasks, such as dinner, that needed to be accomplished that day. Therefore, I asked my caretaker if she would prefer putting off making the recipes until another day. She did. Reducing her stress is as important as keeping my stress level low.
  • Crossing Boundaries: The caretaker’s role, by its very nature, creates intimacy. However, boundaries need to be respected and enforced to be kept healthy.
    • Everyone has a right to privacy and a right to hold their own opinion.  The professional caretaker and the disabled person might form so close a bond that they infringe on each other’s personal matters.
    • If the caretaker is a family member, red flags should be everywhere.  Knowing when to back off is as important as knowing when to intervene.   Keep in mind that respect and gratitude are essential for a healthy relationship.
  • Unrealistic Goals: Expecting a particular outcome that is contrary to objective facts can lead to frustration. Watching for signs of unrealistic goals and talking about them will help.
    • Because the disabled views life through tinted glasses, they can hold unrealistic goals for themselves. They might have too high (or too low) of an expectation of what they can or should accomplish. When the caretaker confronts the sick or disabled with a contrary goal, friction is likely.
    • In addition, many caregivers believe that they can change the physical or emotional life of the disabled. While this may be true to a certain extent, the health and well-being of the sick and disabled will be determined by other factors.
  • Loss of Control: Both caregiver and the disabled will experience a loss of control.  Recognizing that there is frustration on both sides may not prevent the clashes, but, maybe, it will reduce the severity or frequency. Remember, if your caregiver is your spouse or child, they have lost their old lives, too.
    • The sick and disabled have lost a certain amount of control over their lives. Depending on the severity of the situation, the disadvantages can be severe.
    • For the caregiver, they may want to exert control where they have none. The irritation at having to subdue their drive can increase over time. The clash between caregiver and client will erupt eventually.

With increasing burden, lack of control, unrealistic goals, and the frustration, anger, and irritation, a caretaker’s ability to cope will eventually wear thin, and they will no longer be able to function effectively. Hopefully, the needs of the caretaker will be recognized as cogently as the needs of the sick and disabled. We need to take care of our caretaker.

Caregiver Burnout Quiz: https://www.caring.com/articles/caregiver-burnout-quiz

View From a Wheelchair: Finding Truth

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Even before I opened my eyes, I knew something was wrong. Peeking out from under the covers, I saw books, lamps, chairs, everything floating around the room as if in a slow-motion tornado. The strangest of all was that when I stood up, rather than floating, I remained standing. My feet steadfast to the ground. Grabbing hold of my walker, I moved through the room as I tried to make sense of what was going on. Then it hit me; the world had finally fallen apart completely. Up to that point, we had been holding on to some semblance of reality and truth. Now, all the competing truths had finally pulled us apart. We knew it would happen eventually.

For years, truth and reality have been losing their objectivity. Many people no longer believe in an absolute truth. Everything is relative or situational. Crowds are clamoring for social justice, but we cannot even agree on what defines it. Recently, the Michigan State Board of Education outlined, in a memo, voluntary guidelines to make schools safer (and supportive) for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students. Still under development, some of the proposals would call for students: (1) to be addressed by names of their choosing, (2) to use the restroom of their liking, and (3) to have access to the locker room in accordance with their gender identity. Of course, these recommendations ignited a new uproar. The rights of one group are in conflict with the rights of other groups. Somehow, we have lost our way.

Rather than focusing on the merits of the above recommendations, I want to go back to the loss of truth and reality in our lives. How many of us are swirling around the room with the furniture? Are we willing to stand firm and gently pull others to the ground with us? Or, are we looking to yank others into submitting to our way of thinking? Do not misunderstand me; I am not advocating debating with others. Arguments just give birth to more arguments. Is it possible to convince a radical to take a more liberal approach? Do mobs act rationally? Can truths be beaten into another?

My wheelchair confines me, but it also has liberated me. Taking time out from all the activities that can fill our day requires consciousness of ourselves and our surroundings. All the competing noise of the world fills our heads. We do not stop to think about what we hear and what we say. Often, at the end of our day, we collapse into bed, grateful that it is over for the time being. We fool ourselves. The world has been pulled apart at the seams. Foolishness swirls around us 24/7.

Dr. Martin Luther King tried to instill wisdom into a world full of noise and hate. We did not listen then. Will we listen now? He said, “In international conflicts, the truth is hard to come by because most nations are deceived about themselves. Rationalizations and the incessant search for scapegoats are the psychological cataracts that blind us to our sins. But the day has passed for superficial patriotism. He who lives with untruth lives in spiritual slavery. Freedom is still the bonus we receive for knowing the truth. ‘Ye shall know the truth,’ says Jesus, ‘and the truth shall set you free.'”

Even though Martin Luther King was talking about the Vietnam War, we can apply the same philosophy to what is happening in our world, our country, and our lives. Reality is now malleable. Our experiences and mindsets will influence how and what we perceive and understand. The difficulty will be defining truth. Some will even contest the existence of truth. Nevertheless, I would like to examine Dr. King’s statements a little further:

  • (T)he truth is hard to come by because most…are deceived about themselves. Even though Dr. King was addressing nations, we can decide (our reality) whether or not this comment has validity. Be careful now, I am asking you to choose. Is it true? Are people deceived about themselves? If so, does that make it hard to know the truth? Is there a truth?
  • Rationalization and the…search for scapegoats are psychological cataracts that blind us to our sins. Situational ethics and the willingness to blame others for our troubles are tools that have used since the beginning. Our unwillingness to acknowledge our weaknesses makes us vulnerable to pride and arrogance. I know the term “sin” is now very unpopular and out of date. However, it would benefit us and help the world to stop its nauseating gyration if we were willing to acknowledge and admit when we have behaved with immorality. Are we ready to consider that acting out with love is better than acting out with selfishness, rationalization, and hate? Are our cataracts so thick and our blindness so severe that we have become comfortable in the darkness?
  • He who lives with untruth lives in spiritual slavery. Although you may now turn away, it is time to delve into spiritual matters. We can no longer afford to live in a fantasy world where there is no absolute truth. The consequences are too great. Our world has lost its bearing, and we are spinning out of control. While I agree that social justices are being violated (sometimes, in the name of God), we need to look squarely in the mirror and account for our own misdeeds. It is we who are spiritually dead, not God. We are so unglued that our lives have no meaning outside of what we think. We put more weight on our current sets of beliefs than we do on authority other than that which aligns itself with us. In fact, we use authority as a club to beat others.

So, what is untruth, then? Will you admit that pretending is just that, pretending? We pretend that we care or that we don’t care. We pretend that we have more money than we do. We pretend that we are not afraid. We pretend and we lie. We want to live a life without rules for us. We might even live a life of poverty and abstinence because of some social conviction we found along the way. Our sacrifices are limited and shallow. All this, the lies, the sacrifices, the abstinence, will fail to satisfy us. Maybe you are the opposite. You live for today; tomorrow be damned. You have rejected all concepts of reality and truth, other than what you have determined them to be. Still, deep down you still crave meaning. You know that untruth exists. If you are bound to deny, suppress, and repress a reality that is greater than you, then you are a victim of your own doing. Your spirit is chained. Break your bondage and acknowledge that if untruth exists, then truth exists.

  • Freedom is still the bonus we receive for knowing the truth. “Ye shall know the truth,” says Jesus, “and the truth shall set you free.” Freedom is more than being free from something. It is also a state of being free to be something. I may be bound to a wheelchair, but I am grounded. I am free because I know that both untruth and truth exists. I live beyond any momentary affliction. This decision not to be trapped in a mindset of my own doing does not mean I do not feel the anguish or heartache that is part of life. Instead of being tossed about by every emotional whirlwind, I choose to live outside of my emotional distress for I have an anchor to which I have attached myself. My reality is not limited to my mindset.

Dr. King is respected in many communities;  yet, how many people fail to see the connection between Dr. King and his Truth? He aligned himself with Jesus. There is something greater than striving for our gain or, even, for social justice. We have lost our moral compass. If we continue to travel on the winding road of deception, rationalization, and scapegoating, then we will continue to lose our footing in the hurricane of spiritual slavery. There is freedom because there is Truth.

 

“I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life.”
(John 14:6)

 

 

Essential Attributes of a Caretaker

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Caretaker or Care Taker?

One common, compound word: caretaker.  By definition, it means someone who maintains something (a building, an estate, a person).  Albeit maintaining is crucial to the welfare of the building, estate or person, maintaining does not automatically include improving, enhancing, or giving care.  Over the years, I have learned that someone can be a caretaker without being someone who takes care, a caretaker.

The relationship dynamics between caretaker and the disabled person have been examined in books and movies over the years.  Usually, in order to sharpen and create tension, the writer will develop stereotypical characters.  Two examples are: (1) an over-the-top thriller movie, “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane,” which highlights the wheelchair-bound individual’s dependency on another.  In the case of this movie, an unstable caretaker; and (2) a more realistic example is “You’re Not You,” which illustrates how a caretaker can augment the life of another.  Even though both movies are stereotypical, I recommend both for they clearly demonstrate the powerful role that a caretaker plays in the life of a disabled person.

When I first had the opportunity to bring a professional caretaker into my home, it was an unsettling process.  In addition to having a stranger in my home with access to everything, they were independent people who made decisions for me without consulting me.  Where I live, many of the agencies that provide home health care carefully screen potential caretakers for criminal backgrounds, but they do not screen them for the attributes that make a good caretaker.  The soft side of the individual is ignored (caretaker and client).  Consequently, I have had to contend with all sorts of people, from the angry to the apathetic. My current agency not only carefully screens the background of their applicants, but they spend time training them to care.  Through my personal experiences, I have learned that it takes a special person to be a

Through my personal experiences, I have learned that it takes a special person to be a caretaker.  Below, I discuss what I would consider are seven essential attributes.

Sacrificial

Above everything, an excellent caretaker is someone who puts the needs of the disabled person first.  When  I was 30 years old, my husband was diagnosed with cancer.  As his health declined, my role as wife and mother diminished as my role as caretaker intensified.  At first, he only needed me to drive him to his appointments.  In the later stages, he was bedridden.  Nothing mattered more than his comfort and needs.  My world was his world.  As the physical demands became greater, so did his need for emotional support.  Although I wanted to take time for me, I knew that my sacrifice paled in comparison to his suffering.

My role as caretaker was shortlived.  Some caretakers have no end in sight.  Their role seems endless and their needs have to be met.  If the caretaker is a professional, they can get their rest and relaxation at the end of their shift.  However, if the caretaker is a family member that lives with the disabled individual, then they have to learn how to take time for themselves.  A bedraggled caretaker cannot provide the needed care.  Boundaries need to be articulated and established.  Making time for rest and relaxation is crucial for a healthy relationship.

That being said, sacrifice is necessary.  The caretaker has a role: to take care of someone.  Remember, the one who is receiving the care would love to be able to do things for themselves.  There is nothing more discouraging than to feel as if you are a burden.  The emotional status of the chronically ill is delicate and to feel as if you are a burden is equivalent to feeling unloved and unwanted.

Compassion

We all thrive in a positive environment.  Treating the disabled with kindness, respect, and empathy goes a long way in making their life more tolerable.  The disabled have frustration (and some have anger) at the way their lives have evolved.  Consequently, more than ever, a tender hand and a kind heart are imperative.

Recently, while at the hair salon, I watched a caretaker assist a frail, elderly lady transfer from her wheelchair to a hair washing sink.  The caretaker failed to stand close enough to the lady, did not use appropriate techniques to assist the lady in standing, and almost dropped her in the process.  Observing the caretaker’s face, I could see the look of someone who was not engaged.  She rolled her eyes and frowned the whole time.  The lack of compassion was evident.

Reliable

In every career, reliability is a basic standard of performance.  When one person is dependent on another, reliability is paramount.  Last year, I had a caretaker who would fail to show up for work.  She just took random days off.  This left me with no food and no one in my house with me.  The agency would then have to scramble to find someone to fill in.  Many times, it would be 1 p.m. before someone came to give me breakfast.  My caretaker could not (or would not) understand that a late night partying was not substantially good behavior (or reason to call off) for a caregiver.  Even though I liked her, she knew that failing to show up for work would leave me without food and care.  This woman did not have an essential attribute for her position.

Adaptable

Often times, we have our own ways of doing things.  I happen to like clean kitchen counters, my clothes organized in my closet, and my food prepared a certain way.  Even though it might appear to be arbitrary decisions, I have reasons.  Clean kitchen counters translate into less likelihood of food contamination; an organized closet makes it easier for me to pick out clothes; and, I am committed to eating healthier food.

Doing the above tasks the way I prefer them to be completed makes my life easier.  Both my husband and my professional caretaker have adjusted their styles to assist me.  They are conscious of how their flexibility helps make my life more enjoyable.  In fact, when they help me get dressed, I can tell them exactly where to look for a particular item of clothing (for example).  This attribute of adaptability is pivotal as they adjust their behavior and become an extension of me.  Through them, I can accomplish some fundamental tasks.

Agreeable

You might think that agreeable could be included in the above category, “Adaptable.”  However, there is a distinction would mentioning.  While someone might adapt their behavior to another’s way of doing things, performing it with a smile makes the whole process less stressful.  I am sure that you have experienced times when someone has been patient with you.  It is a gift.  The relationship is deepened and strengthened just by having an agreeable companion.  The journey’s burden is lightened.

Confidential

Knowing that you are in control of your information and your life helps to maintain a sense of well-being.  From the unimportant minutiae (how I like my clothes folded) to the important details (what medicines I am taking), they all a part of me.  They are my being, my personhood.  When someone violates confidentiality, they are violating boundaries.  Two years ago, I heard the news about a disabled woman’s murder.  It turned out that the woman had a caretaker.  The caretaker had a boyfriend.  The boyfriend was told about the medical condition, habits, and items in the home.  The result:  the boyfriend broke into the disabled woman’s home, killed her, and robbed the home of money and items.

Teachable

Being open to learning a new or different way of performing tasks is a valuable asset for life in general.  When it comes to being an extension of another person, being teachable is essential for the caretaker.  Learning how to assist the disabled person gives the disabled a sense of accomplishment.

One recent caretaker made fabulous meals for me.  When she first started, she had some knowledge about healthier food choices.  Over the year, she learned about scallions, shallots, white onions vs. Vidalia onions, portobello and chanterelle mushrooms, spices, seasonings, salmon, tuna, grapeseed oil, parmesan and asiago cheese, serrano peppers, quinoa, brown rice, and how to make homemade chai nuts, granola, guacamole, pico de gallo, and mango salsa.  Actually, the list could be longer.  My point is that learning how to be the arms of another, while letting the disabled still have whatever control remains, is life affirming to the individual receiving care.

Faith

When facing difficult situations, any individual with a strong belief usually finds a way to persevere.  For a caretaker, their faith gives them the added benefit of a sense of purpose.  I have known caretakers whose only motivation was to get a paycheck at the end of the week.  While this is an undeniable motivator for most people, it can leave the caretaker feeling uninspired.  Over the past four years, I have worked with caretakers who did not believe in anything.  The odd discovery of working with them was that most were often angry and erratic.  However, the caretakers with faith believed that they were serving an important role.  And, I can tell you, they do serve an important role!

One Final Word

Caretakers who are caretakers are caregivers.  They promote and support the intangible needs of the disabled.  Speaking for the disabled, “Thank you.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View from a Wheelchair: Expectations

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Imagine you are in a Disney film. As you raise your head, you discover your arms are shackled to a prison wall. The ray of thin, blue light filtering in from the barred window reveals a bleak room. In anger, you scream at the shadows about injustice. This is not how you expected your life would be. Somehow, something went awry. Maybe, you are living with a chronic illness, or you are taking care of someone who is disabled, or you lost a loved one too soon.

“Life is unfair,” you whimper.  “God, why me?”

Rather than continuing your rant, you change your stance. As you slowly let go of your anger and frustration, tiny rays of beautiful light start to emanate from you. The more you surrender, the stronger the light and the bigger the rays. Eventually, the rays are so abundant that they form a bubble of intense beauty. To your surprise, you are no longer shackled and the bubble envelopes you.

When you open the door to your prison, you discover a dark world that is being transformed into a beautiful and colorful world with the passing of your bubble. Continuing along, you encounter people. Some of them need help; others have hurt you and need forgiveness. As you attend to them, your bubble grows larger. Now, they and their surroundings are part of your bubble. All around you, the world is a better place because of your bubble of acceptance, forgiveness, and love.

I know the above scenario is a little too much, but the hope that we can help ourselves and others is my dream. Of course, I fail to keep my emotions in check at all times; however, I do want to make every effort to add to my faith. Letting go of all the disappointments and hurt feelings is a priority. It is a constant battle for it seems as if we prefer to harbor perceived offenses. Somehow, we have to change our mindset and realize that feelings are just feelings. And, you have some say in what you do with those feelings.

You might have heard me say this before, but I say it again, you are in control of your reality; you can decide what feelings you will attach to any circumstance. It will not be easy, but it is possible. Start small. Think of a situation in which you were less than happy. Now, examine the feeling and identify the feeling, the emotion, and the cause. You might find that the reason relates to a past disappointment. Maybe the cause is an emotionally charged, historical trauma. As you discover the root of the emotion, you will have the opportunity to spend time resolving the feelings.

Another technique that my husband uses all the time is to ask yourself what matters to you. Do you love the person who has hurt you? If so, then choosing to love them at that moment will diffuse the situation for you. If it is someone who always seems to irritate you, ask yourself what is the real cause of the irritation. Again, the source might be a historical catalyst.

Many times, the problem stems from unrealized expectations. What you thought would happen did not occur. I believe that this is a significant reason for conflict between people.  Hopes are dashed, and feelings get hurt. As our emotions kick in, chemicals are released into our bloodstream, and we react rather than respond.

It might seem silly to you, all this talk about finding ways to forgive and the bubble of hope, healing, and delight that will be the result. All I know is that as I spend time looking at myself and finding the cause of my feelings, I can forgive. I have a long way to go. Some people were evil enemies in my life, but I am determined to find a way to love and forgive them. I do not want to be a hater. I choose not to spew more disgusting wickedness into the world with negative attitudes.

The world is turning and twisting in a whirlwind of violence, hate, and selfishness. Minds and hearts are lost in darkness. Those of us who can see the shadows have the discretion to make a difference. Every one of us lives in a bubble of our making. We can live in a bubble of hope or despair. My choice: finding a way to add to my faith goodness, neighborly love, and agape love (sacrificial love) is a worthwhile activity.

My expectation? To possess faith, have hope, and enjoy life with others in a colorful bubble.

 

View from a Wheelchair: Easter

Easter

Although you would not know it from all the fanfare given to Christmas, Easter is the most meaningful holiday for the Christian.  It is the day that Old Testament prophecy was fulfilled and a New Covenant was established.  For believers, it signifies atonement and rebirth.

Sitting here, in this wheelchair, as I think about the coming high holiday and the promise of rebirth, I am struck by the weight of the entire story:  God and man; birth and rebirth.  Even if you do not believe, does the idea of having the opportunity to begin anew entice you?

When I was young, all I wanted was to get along with people and to have a good time.  With the birth of my daughter, I matured instantly.  As I looked at her innocent face and delicate body, I was infused with a strong desire to do everything I could to protect her and give her a good life.  I failed miserably, but I loved her.  I still do, love her.

Knowing how much I love my daughter gives me an inkling of how much God loves me.  To live with love is a gift.  To give love is an honor.  Even though I have many shortcomings, I am continually being renewed.  My temperance is strengthened and I find hope in every day.

Now, rather than just wanting to have a good time and to get along with people, I have a purpose.   The wheelchair does not limit me.  Rather, it gives me freedom to consider others, to notice them, and to reach out to them.  I am different.  I am a new creature.

Many people think of Christians as judgmental or even hateful.  I am distressed by this common portrayal of Christians for it includes me.  Here is an insight into what God requires of me:  “To do what is right to other people, to love being kind to others, and to live humbly, obeying my God.”  (Micah 6:8)

So, Easter is a time of celebration.  I am mindful of God’s New Covenant and of His love for all people.  Also, it is a time to gather together and celebrate love and relationships.  We were created to have partnerships.  Even though I am mobility challenged, I will spend the day with my daughter and extended family.  Everything has been planned and arranged to accommodate me and my wheelchair.  We will start the day with attendance at a church service and end the day with extended family time.

There is no greater gift than love.